PDA Tucson Clean Elections Forum Nov 16 (video)

Clean Elections

What is Clean Elections all about? Why would anyone choose to run for office using Arizona’s Clean Elections system– rather than run a “traditional” political campaign fueled by as much cash as you can rake in? How does the Clean Elections system work? What are the advantages and disadvantages to running a publicly funded campaign vs a privately funded campaign?

Please join former Arizona Senate Minority Leader Phil Lopes and I at the PDA Tucson Clean Elections Forum, Thursday, Nov. 16 at 6:30 p.m. at the Ward 6 office (Facebook event here.) Phil ran clean and won every election. I ran clean and won in 2016, and my 2018 re-election campaign is also a clean campaign.

If you think that big-money politics and special interests are destroying our democracy, come on down and learn about Clean Elections. Have you been toying with the idea of running for office but can’t stand the idea of making hundreds of fundraising phone calls to raise the cash the consultants say you need?

Clean Elections is a grassroots system of organizing and funding a political campaign; it was created by the Citizens Initiative process. Candidates are required to collect a designated number of $5 qualifying contributions from people who can vote for them, plus collect signatures like other candidates. Once Legislative candidates have collected a minimum of 200 valid $5 contributions, they qualify for public funds and agree not to take any donations from corporations, special interest PACs, or dirty money from secret sources. With public funds, seed money, and family money, Clean Elections candidates receive approximately $45,000 to run for office. Is $45,000 enough money to run for office? Yes! If you look at campaign finance reports, there are current Legislators who won their offices with $1000 or less! Campaign finance is all over the map. In 2016, my average seed money donation was $25. (The maximum donation for a clean candidate is $160; the maximum donation for a privately funded candidate is $5000. A stark contrast.)

Legislative candidates in LD9 (Victoria Steele, Jim Love and me), LD2 (Senator Andrea Dalessandro and Rep. Rosanna Gabaldon), and LD3 (Senator Olivia Cajero-Bedford and Betty Villegas) are running clean– along with several statewide candidates for department of education and Arizona Corporation Commission. You can support them by clicking here to donate $5.

Save Clean Elections: Let Your Voice Be Heard (video)

Pamela Powers Hannley

Progressives, we have a situation…

If you want to get big money out of politics and you like Arizona’s Clean Elections system, it’s time to speak up to save it. Irregularities in the 2016 election prompted proposed rule changes by the Citizens Clean Elections Commission. (There are three versions of R2-20-702 and a new rule R2-20-703.01 – here. You can send your comments to ccec@azcleanelections.gov or go to this link and submit comments by June 19, before the commission votes at its next meeting on June 22, 2017.)

Below is the back story and a detailed explanation of the proposed rule changes.

After collecting the requisite number of petition signatures and $5 qualifying donations from people who can vote for them, Clean Elections candidates (like me) receive lump sums of $16,000 for the primary and $24,000 for the general election– in exchange for vowing not to take big money donations. With seed money and family money, the total for a Clean Elections candidate is roughly $45,000 for a Legislative campaign. All unspent CE funds must be returned to the CE commission, and all unspent seed money or seed money overage must be returned to the individual donors.

During the 2016 election, two Democratic Party Clean Elections candidates turned over all or most of their CE funds in a lump sum to the Arizona Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (ADLCC) of the Arizona Democratic Party (ADP) to run their campaigns, provide paid staff, and purchase/design/mail their printed materials. ADLCC provides these services to many traditionally funded candidates and offered them to CE candidates as well in 2016. A problem arose with at least two CE candidates because the party didn’t provide individual invoices for specific services rendered.

Continue reading Save Clean Elections: Let Your Voice Be Heard (video)

Bernie, Donald & Me: Beyond the Victory on Nov 8

Representative-Elect Pamela Powers Hannley
Representative-Elect Pamela Powers Hannley

At 5 a.m. on Nov. 9, 2016, I had an existential crisis. How could a Progressive candidate like me win election on the same day as Donald Trump?

The LD9 team won early on Nov. 8. Randy, Steve and I were the first winners to take the stage at the Pima County Democratic Party party in the Marriott Hotel, where many of us watched President Barack Obama win twice.

Excitement was in the air. Everyone was so cheery. The polls all told us that our candidate– the first woman president– would win handily. Yes, of course, one poll said that Hillary Clinton would win by only 3%, but how could that be when all other polls were so high in favor of her?

Now we all know what happened. The polls were wrong. Twenty-five years of lies; millions of social media shares of questionable meme attacks and fake news; editorializing instead of news analysis by mainstream news media; Russian hacks; dithering, drawn-out FBI investigation of those @#$% emails;  and deep-seeded sexism took down the most qualified candidate and gave us a president who promises to rule with an authoritarian hand.

The Message

So, how did I win on the same night Trump won?

Continue reading Bernie, Donald & Me: Beyond the Victory on Nov 8

Pamela Powers Hannley: Voice of the People (video)

Pamela Powers Hannley

For more than a year now, I have been running for the Legislature to serve Legislative District 9 in the Arizona House.

Along the campaign trail, I have met 1000s of you at community events, like the Hunger Walk, Cyclovia, the Garden District Porch Fest, the Labor Day picnic, the Martin Luther King Jr. Day march, the Peace Fair, Poetry Center activities, and other events.

I’ve met you at dozens of house parties and coffees with the candidate events.

I’ve met you at meetings like Democrats of Greater Tucson, the Nucleus Club, the Democratic Party State Committee meetings, and the LD9 meetings.

I’ve seen your creativity when I stopped at your doorsteps, and I’ve heard your passion at rallies.

I understand you because I am one of you. I’m a Mom and a Grandma. I worked in a factory, in a laundry, on a landscape crew, and as a waitress. I have climbed the corporate career ladder, and I’ve been laid off.

I want to be your voice– the voice of workers and families– in the Arizona Legislature because I believe too many lawmakers represent big corporations and not the people of Arizona.

Continue reading Pamela Powers Hannley: Voice of the People (video)

Know Your Candidates before You Vote

Pamela Powers Hannley

Residents of Legislative District 9 have a clear choice for Arizona House. Two Democrats Rep. Randy Friese and Pamela Powers Hannley are running against Tea Party candidate Ana Henderson.

The Clean Elections debate revealed major differences between Henderson’s extreme Tea Party positions and the two Democrats’ views.

To simplify your voting decision, I revised my ven diagram (below) comparing where I stand on the issues and where Henderson stands.

Continue reading Know Your Candidates before You Vote

#LD9 Voters – Can’t Decide How to Vote? Watch the Debate (video)

Randy Friese, Pamela Powers Hannley, Ana Henderson

The Arizona Clean Elections Commission recently hosted a debate between the three candidates vying for two seats in the Arizona House: Democrats Rep. Randy Friese and Pamela Powers Hannley (me) and Tea Party Republican Ana Henderson.

This debate was the first candidate forum that Henderson participated in with the two Democrats, and it’s likely the last. With 75 or more people from both parties, the debate was well-attended. The audience submitted many great questions. Some questions are asked of all candidates– like education funding, climate change, Prop 205 (marijuana legalization), and Prop 206 (raising the minimum wage).

Below is the video.

If you want to skip through the topics, there’s a list of the high points below.

Continue reading #LD9 Voters – Can’t Decide How to Vote? Watch the Debate (video)

Pamela Powers Hannley: Small Business Owner

Did you ever notice that politicians often have “three things” to say.

“Three things” we campaign on, like– 1) economic reform and public banking; 2) equality and paycheck fairness; and 3) targeting opiates with anti-drug efforts.

And often “three things” to describe ourselves, like– 1) public health advocate, 2) small business owner and 3) communicator.

This blog post focuses on my experience as a small business owner.

Small Business Owner

Pamela Powers Hannley, small business
PQA promotional brochure and business cards

I have owned two successful small businesses during my professional career– Powers/Queen Associates (PQA) and Wind Dancer Design.

PQA was my communication consulting business. I was a freelance writer, photographer, and graphic designer from 1987-93 with many quality clients like the Arizona Cancer Center, the University of Arizona Foundation, Tucson Mall, Jones Intercable, TUSD, Great American Bank in Arizona and California, Tucson Lifestyle Magazine, and others. My niche was annual reports, and I won Silver Quill awards for annual reports, for writing, and for photography. I had clients who hired me because I could do everything related to producing a publication– writing, photography, design and print production management– and clients who just wanted one service– particularly photography.

Continue reading Pamela Powers Hannley: Small Business Owner

#LD9 Debate Reveals Clear Choices Between Dem & GOP Candidates

Randy Friese, Pamela Powers Hannley, Ana Henderson

Rep. Randy Friese, Pamela Powers Hannley (me) and Ana Henderson– the three candidates for the two Legislative District 9 seats in the Arizona House– faced off on Friday night in front of a packed house for the LD9 Clean Elections Debate.

This was the first event– and perhaps the only event– in which voters got to hear all three candidates. Friese and I were the only LD9 candidates who appeared at the Pima County Interfaith Council Candidate Forum, the candidate forum sponsored by the UA pre-law candidate forum, the Arizona Daily Star candidate interview and Pride on Parade— besides all of the joint events with Matt Kopec during the primary. (OK, so Pride wasn’t a candidate forum, but many candidates turned out to show their support for the LGBTQ community and celebrate diversity.)

So– even though this is the first time that most of us got to hear Henderson talk, we learned a lot about her views. Climate change, reproductive choice, homelessness, corporate tax cuts, minimum wage, public banking, gun violence, and, of course, education– the three of us fielded a wide variety of questions from the audience last night. (I’ll link the full video when it is available on the Clean Elections YouTube channel.)

Here’s we learned about Ana Henderson at the debate.

She’s against raising the minimum wage. (She said it’s bad for business, and government shouldn’t be meddling in business– except to dole out more corporate welfare. In a town with a 25% poverty rate, too many workers are just scraping by in the gig economy. They can’t buy the goods businesses are selling if they have no expendable income.)

She’s against legalization of marijuana. (In her opinion, marijuana– a plant that never killed anyone– is dangerous for children, but a loaded gun in the house is safe. Yes, we need to work on impairment definitions for marijuana– and other drugs. And, yes, dosing for edibles has to be improved. When you buy a whole Snickers bar, you expect to eat the whole thing– not just a 1/4 inch of it. And, yes, parents should protect their children from accidental drug poisoning and from accidental death by firearms.)

She’s a climate change denier. (She’s in the it’s-just-a-theory camp on climate change. She stands with free market forces on the question of incentivizing people to install solar panels. Friese and I both said clearly that climate change is real. Look at the increased dust storms, flooding, and fires. We should take our heads out of the desert sand and start planning for the changes in order to mitigate their effects. Look at the increased dust storms, flooding, and fires.)

She thinks corporate taxes are too high and supports more trickle down economics. (Friese and I attacked the $4 billion in corporate tax cuts repeatedly last night, and she defended them as necessary to boost the economy. We’ve been waiting for 35 years for trickle down economics to work. Time’s up.)

She likes public education but supports expanding vouchers. (Friese and I talked a lot about public education funding, educational goals not met, teacher retention, and shortchanging our future by denying a good education to so many children. Her main point was parental choice– a buzzword for more vouchers. Republicans like to say that Arizona is #1 in school choice. The other way to phrase this is: Arizona has cut and weakened public education more than any other state. That’s not something to be proud of.)

She supports “small government.” (Republicans tout “small government” when running for office, but once they are in office, Arizona Republican Legislators routinely pass 300-400 new laws each year. If you average that at 350/year for each year since the Tea Party took over in 2010, that’s 2100 new laws. I had fun pointing that out that 2100 new laws in six years is “too much government regulation.” Ha!)

She supports Donald Trump for President and made excuses for his now-infamous bragging about sexually assaulting women. Her “everyone does it even women” excuse for “vulgar locker room talk” was shocking.

The debate video will be up in a few days. I’ll post the link when available.




#AZ Star Endorses Pamela Powers Hannley & Other News

Arizona Daily Star

LD9 incumbent Rep. Randy Friese and I met with representatives from the Arizona Daily Star a few weeks ago to share ideas and answer their questions. Traditionally, the Star meets with all candidates for a position simultaneously, but LD9 Tea Party challenger Ana Henderson did not attend the interview.

On Sunday, Oct 9, the Star released their endorsements, and I’m proud to say that they endorsed me– along with the LD9 incumbents Friese and Senator Steve Farley. Here is an excerpt from the endorsement story.

On the House side, we endorse incumbent Randy Friese and newcomer Pamela Powers Hannley.

They are a solid combination and compliment each other’s strengths with experience and policy knowledge.

Friese and Powers Hannley are Democrats running against another newcomer, Republican Ana Henderson.

Powers Hannley identified the economy as her top priority, which isn’t unusual for a political candidate.

What makes her stand out, however, is that she’s not identifying “jobs” as her platform but puts economic stability and viability in a larger frame. She thinks of it “broadly, to lift people out of poverty.”

She supports an increased minimum wage and identifies corporate tax cuts and loopholes as a target to increase state revenue to spend on urgent needs, such as public education.

“These are issues that are not one-party issues,” she said. She cited paycheck equality and fairness as an example.

She also rightly points out that the southern end of LD 9, in midtown Tucson, is rife with rundown housing and that many residents don’t have the means to maintain or improve their property.

She raised the possibility of Arizona forming a public bank, which could give residents low-interest loans to improve their homes or businesses. We’re not ready to sign on to that just yet, but we appreciate her innovative thinking and reaching for different ideas.

To read the full story, here’s the link:

Star endorsement: Arizona Legislative District 9

Here are a few other news stories about the LD9 race:

Here are the local candidates we recommend this election (Star)

Steller: Candidates increasingly view debates as optional (Star)

Three candidates battle for two House seats in District 9 (Star)

Political Notebook: Anti-McCain primary votes loom large (Star)

State House: Most incumbent Democrats doing well (Star)

Legislative District 9 races (Blog for Arizona)

Who Is Ana Henderson? (Blog for Arizona)

Union roots propel Amherst native in Arizona House race (Amherst News Times – my hometown newspaper.)

#LD9 Debate Reveals Clear Choices Between Dem & GOP Candidates (For a recap of the LD9 debate on Oct 14.)


#PowersForThePeople Update: LD9 Debate & Volunteer Opportunities

Randy Friese, Pamela Powers Hannley, Steve Farley

Now that early voting has started and now that mailed ballots, the election information booklets, and the first of the campaign mailers have gone out, the Nov. 8 election is officially underway in Arizona.

There are big events coming up this week in the LD9 race.

Oct 14: LD9 Clean Elections Debate

The LD9 Clean Elections debate will be held at the Pima Community College Northwest Campus at 6-7 p.m. on Friday, Oct 14.  Please come if you can. This will be the first chance (and perhaps the only chance) you the voters will get to see all three LD9 House candidates together: incumbent Rep. Randy Friese, Tea Party challenger Ana Henderson, and me. Audience members can submit questions. If there are questions you want to ask, this is your chance! If you miss the debate, watch for the link posted on my website in the future. (Facebook event here.)

Oct 15-16: LD9 Canvassing & GOTV Phone Banking

The Arizona Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (ADLCC) and the Pima County Democrats are organizing a massive Get Out the Vote Effort this weekend. There will be canvassing shifts throughout both days and phone banking from multiple locations. Contact Erin Burton (270-978-7866) for information or check out the Facebook link and show up!  (Facebook event here.)

Thanks for helping us hold LD9 for the Democrats! #DumpTheTeaParty

P.S. Just to clarify, the photo above includes Senator Steve Farley with Randy and me, but Steve will not be participating in the debate because he is running unopposed.